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June 25, 2007, 8:33 PM CT

Obesity And Tuberculosis

Obesity And Tuberculosis
Obese or overweight Chinese individuals age 65 and older have a lower risk of developing tuberculosis than those at a normal weight, as per a research studyin the June 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Tuberculosis is usually linked to poverty and undernutrition in both developed and developing countries. In addition, obesity is an increasing problem that is linked to a wide range of chronic degenerative conditions, notably, diabetes mellitus, a well-reported predisposing factor for active tuberculosis, as per background information in the article. Few studies have systematically examined the effect of obesity and overweight on tuberculosis, particularly in Asian populations.

Chi C. Leung, M.B.B.S., Tuberculosis and Chest Service, Hong Kong, and his colleagues, studied 42,116 individuals 65 years or older enrolled in 18 health centers for elderly patients in Hong Kong. The patients were followed up from three months after enrollment in 2000 until December 31, 2005. The body mass index (BMI) of each patient was measured at the beginning of the study. Those with a BMI of less than 18.5 were grouped as underweight, 18.5 to less than 23 as normal, 23 to less than 25 as at risk (for obesity), 25 to less than 30 as overweight, and 30 or higher as obese.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


Sun, 24 Jun 2007 15:02:31 GMT

Will you ever be able to buy fitness in a bottle?

Will you ever be able to buy fitness in a bottle?
The diet pill industry is worth billions per year in the US alone so there’s huge incentive for companies to market miracle pills and the 1994 Dietary Supplement Act makes it easy.Bob Park. This means that neither safety nor efficacy need to be proven for “natural” remedies anpredictable results.

Despite this, the idea that drugs can help with weight loss and even improve fitness is plausible. Indeed, the possibility that some future drug might live up to the claims made by these pill pushers seems ever more likthe recent announcement from Ronald Evans’s lab at the Salk Institute. They are “now able to chemically switch on PPAR-d, the master regulator that controls the ability of cells to burn fat. Even when the mice are not active, turning on the chemical switch activates the same fat-burning process that occurs during exercise.” As we get better and better at controlling metabolic activity with drugs, we will undoubtedly see more applications like this. If life is just chemistry (albeit exquisitely complex and subtle chemistry) there’s nothing stopping us from controlling biology with clever pills. Jake puts it tRonald Evans’s lab:

True, the signaling cascades activated by exercise are just that — signaling cascades. Exercise works because it changes the molecular biology of cells, and there is no reason that we can’t enforce that same type of activation sans all the running arounRonald Evans’s lab probable that something similar will eventually work for muscle building, but do these effects require some exercise or could someone lie in bed for a few months, pop pills, eat chocolate, and emerge a body builder? That’s an interesting question to me not only because I like lying in bed, but also because its answer might reveal an essential role for force in fitness. Put another way, do some signaling cascades critical for fitness involve more than just chemical but physical signals? Maybe that’s why they call it physical activity.

We already know of examples of cryptic sites in proteins involved in signaling that are exposed in response to force Ronald Evans’s lab from Harold Erickson’s lab available freely from Pubmed) and if some of these processes are also activated during exercise it might not be possible even in principle to use pills to develop good overall fitness. But don’t despair, maybe a combination of fat burning, muscle building drugs and a therapeutic stretching rack would do the trick…

Posted by: Andre      Read more     Source


Fri, 22 Jun 2007 02:04:29 GMT

Trimming off the truth

Trimming off the truth
Dieting is a multi-billion dollar industry in the United States, and no wonder, with the world's largest obese population. I have a huge gripe with the dieting industry that I won't get into here, but the short of it is - if you ate right to begin with, you wouldn't have this problem!

A healthy lifestyle is exactly that - a lifestyle. But the dieting industry would have you believe you can just take a pill and all your worries will be gone. Pillpills cause illness, pills create more problems than they cure - do I really have to go on?

Not an ally

GlaxoSmithKline has released a half-dose over the counter version of XeniAlli. However, the web site, paid "consultants," and bottle labelling are not up front about the biggest sidwildly uncontrollable stools. It does tepidly mention it, but the absence of testimonials says it all.

Just yesterday I poomission of facts and word choice. Big Pharma is still up to the same old antics.

Posted by: Miche      Read more     Source


June 12, 2007, 5:09 AM CT

Sleep problems may affect a person's diet

Sleep problems may affect a person's diet
Sleep problems can influence a persons diet. Those who dont get enough sleep are less likely to cook their own meals and, instead, opt to eat fast food. It is the lack of nutritional value of this restaurant-prepared food that may cause health problems for these people in the long-run, as per a research abstract that will be presented Monday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS).

Mindy Engle-Friedman, PhD, of the City University of New York, surveyed nine females and 12 males, all undergraduates who completed a "sleep and eating habits" questionnaire. For seven days, the participants completed diaries, with each entry detailing how much sleep they got the night before and what they ate the following day.

Preliminary findings showed that individuals reporting problems with total sleep time, sleep latency and awakenings were more likely to eat restaurant-prepared or fast food rather than food made at home on day two than were individuals with no reported sleep problems. Further, individuals with sleep problems were also less likely to eat food prepared at home on days four and seven.

"Persons with sleep complaints are less likely to eat at home. These meals may require less effort and may be less healthful than meals prepared at home. Over time, persons with sleep complaints may have weight or health problems correlation to their nutrition," said Engle-Friedman.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


Fri, 08 Jun 2007 23:31:45 GMT

Diet Coke Just Got A Healthy Partner

Diet Coke Just Got A Healthy Partner
Diet Coke just got friendlier-- with Diet Coke Plus! This tweak on the original formula includes vitamins and minerals -- including vitamin B 6 & 12, Niacin and 10% zinc and magnesium! Definitely for those concerned with making sure they get a balanced healthy diet but still have some soda too! This makes for a healthier alternative for those wanting to keep strong bones yet have that soda that they often crave. It's suitable for men, women, teens (the most likely to guzzle the stuff), and children. It's a more health conscious alternative for those who love their soda!

It's definitely new and different--without a loss of taste or fizz!

Posted by: Stevie Wilson      Read more     Source


May 31, 2007, 11:55 PM CT

Success Of Obesity Intervention Program For Inner-city Girls

Success Of Obesity Intervention Program For Inner-city Girls
The effectiveness of the "Energy Up" program developed by lifestyle and fitness leader Kathie Dolgin known to her students as High Voltage, has recently been reviewed in an article reported in the recent issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health (www.adolescenthealth.org/journal.htm). The health brief titled,"Energy Up" A Novel Approach to the Weight Management of Inner-City Teens," describes the positive results of this school-based, nutrition and fitness pilot program.

The research gathered shows that the "Energy Up" program works and is successful in dealing with behavioral issues of adolescent girls. The program under review took place at an all girl, parochial high school in New York City during the school year of 2003-2004. Participants in "Energy Up" lost a significant amount of weight. Obese girls lost the most weight while normal weight girls gained what was expected for their age. The girls changed their lifestyle by eating better, exercising more and building self-esteem.

Unlike other obesity prevention programs, "Energy Up" is not based on the health belief model which states that teens are unhealthy because they dont know certain behaviors are harmful. Instead, this novel program identifies why teens engage in unhealthy behaviors, specifically overeating, and acknowledges that a number of young people overeat when they know it is bad for them. "Energy Up" looks at causes, as opposed to being reactionary.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


May 23, 2007, 7:55 PM CT

grim warning for America's fast food consumers

grim warning for America's fast food consumers
It's research that may have you thinking twice before upgrading to the large size at your favorite fast food joint. Saint Louis University research presented this week in Washington, D.C., shows the dangers of high-fat food combined with high fructose corn syrup and a sedentary lifestyle in other words, what may be becoming commonplace among Americans.

Brent Tetri, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at Saint Louis University Liver Center, and his colleagues studied the effects of a diet that was 40 percent fat and replete with high fructose corn syrup, a sweetener common in soda and some fruit juices. The research is being presented at the Digestive Diseases Week meeting.

"We wanted to mirror the kind of diet a number of Americans subsist on, so the high fat content is about the same you'd find in a typical McDonald's meal, and the high fructose corn syrup translates to about eight cans of soda a day in a human diet, which is not far off with what some people consume," says Tetri, a leading researcher in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which can lead to cirrhosis and, ultimately, death. "But we were also keeping the mice sedentary, with a very limited amount of activity".

The study, which lasted for 16 weeks, had some curious results, says Tetri.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


Mon, 21 May 2007 15:22:18 GMT

How To Lose Weight At The Office

How To Lose Weight At The Office
A treadmill workstation. Fascinating. I wonder if the increased blood flow would make workers more productive. A study done on the device showed that people actually enjoyed using it. Read more at Cognitive Daily.

Posted by: rob      Read more     Source


Wed, 16 May 2007 03:46:36 GMT

Drop Excess Baggage

Drop Excess Baggage
This is an interesting print advertisement campaign launched by India’s leading beauty and fitness company VLCC to promote their weight loss program. The campaign is apparently aims at conveying by adjusting a part of the ingredients of the meals one could be able to reduce weight. The advertisements are showing some edible items are being shaped as accessories in order to show that how by adjusting meals and taking them in right proportion could have positive effect on a body.

The presentation of the campaign is certainly indicative in nature but it successfully conveys its message across. There is also remarkable touch of a fine art direction and retouching. The text of the advertisement reads, ‘Drop Excess Baggage - We evaluate your gender, age, lifestyle and your ethnic background before formulating a scientific slimming plan. Our dieticians, nutrition & slimming experts, physiotherapists & therapeutic specialists ensure that you shed those extra pounds. - VLCC Slimming, Skin & Hair Services’.

Via Coolzor

Posted by: Balendu      Read more     Source


May 9, 2007, 11:21 PM CT

Study confirms health benefits of whole grains

Study confirms health benefits of whole grains
A diet high in whole grain foods is linked to a significantly lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, as per an analysis conducted by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

"Consuming an average of 2.5 servings of whole grains each day is linked to a 21 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease in comparison to consuming only 0.2 servings," said Philip Mellen, M.D., lead author and an assistant professor of internal medicine. "These findings suggest that we should redouble our efforts to encourage patients to include more of these foods in their diets".

These results were published on line in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases and will appear in a future print issue.

The findings are based on an analysis of seven studies involving more than 285,000 people. By combining the data from these seven studies, scientists were able to detect effects that may not have shown up in each individual study. The studies were conducted between 1966 and April 2006.

Mellen said the findings are consistent with earlier research, but that despite abundant evidence about the health benefits of whole grains, intake remains low. A nutrition survey conducted between 1999 and 2000 observed that only 8 percent of U.S. adults consumed three or more servings of whole grain per day and that 42 percent of adults ate no whole grains on a given day.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


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