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January 10, 2007, 4:25 AM CT

About Children's Packed Lunches

About Children's Packed Lunches
Packed lunches taken to school by 7-year olds are even less healthy than school meals used to be before Jamie Oliver set out to reform them.

The Children of the 90s study, based at the University of Bristol, revealed today that in the year 2000, school meals were every bit as bad a Jamie Oliver suggested - but that children given packed lunches instead were even worse off nutritionally.

Dr Pauline Emmett, Nutritionist and Dietician, who is in charge of the nutritional part of Children of the 90s said: 'We compared nutrients in foods brought by hundreds of children in their packed lunches to recommendations and observed that they fell short in important nutrients like potassium and zinc and were much too high in sugar and saturated fat. The foods eaten in the rest of the day did not compensate for this.

"Children who ate school dinners had higher intakes of protein and most vitamins and minerals, and lower intakes of sugar and saturated fat.

"The Food Standards Agency recommends that packed lunches should ideally contain a starchy food, a protein food, a dairy item, a vegetable/salad and a fruit. Only 3.5% of packed lunches did contain them all and almost half (44.3%) included 2 or less. Packets of crisps and chocolate biscuits were the most usually eaten foods after white bread with some type of fat spread.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


January 7, 2007, 8:36 AM CT

Shed Pounds And Keep Cancer At Bay

Shed Pounds And Keep Cancer At Bay
While millions of Americans place fitness as one of their top New Year's resolutions to improve shape, muscle tone and overall appearance, cancer survivors have another priority - life.

Scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have developed a customized fitness program to help survivors of endometrial cancer - or cancer of the uterus - shed pounds and keep cancer at bay. Karen Basen-Engquist, Ph.D., principal investigator of the five-year "Steps to Health" study and associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Science, aims to determine how well participants adhere to a personalized fitness plan, motivation both for beginning and sustaining regular workouts and the role of a support system in encouraging determination.

All endometrial cancer survivors who are six months post therapy - from M. D. Anderson or elsewhere - are eligible to participate in the Steps to Health study, funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Following an initial 30-minute orientation, including an electrocardiogram, scientists will assess participants at baseline and again every two months using a series of health and quality-of-life questionnaires, as well as fitness tests on an exercise bike. Depending on a participant's current physical ability, exercise physiologists and fitness specialists then will create a customized plan for each survivor.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


January 7, 2007, 7:04 AM CT

Foods High In Calcium, Vitamin D And Prevention Of Osteoporosis

Foods High In Calcium, Vitamin D And Prevention Of Osteoporosis
The Food and Drug Administration has issued a new and amended health claims with regard to consumption of foods that are rich in vitamin D and calcium. This new statement is meant to educate consumers the value of foods high in calcium and vitamin D for reducing the risk of osteoporosis. The National Dairy Council acknowledges and supports the body of scientific evidence that backs the proposed claim, which indicates that a lifestyle that includes a well-balanced diet with adequate calcium and vitamin D, and physical activity, helps reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

"The proposed claim provides a clearer way to communicate the benefits of calcium and vitamin D in bone health," says Ann Marie Krautheim, registered dietitian and senior vice president of nutrition and health promotion at the National Dairy Council. "We hope the simplified language will help consumers better understand the importance of three daily servings of dairy to obtain these nutrients and reduce the risk of osteoporosis".

Together, milk, cheese and yogurt provide excellent sources of calcium and vitamin D. In addition to calcium and vitamin D, the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Bone Health and Osteoporosis recognizes the role of many other nutrients in dairy foods, including magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and protein, that work together to help protect bones. The report also recognizes the importance of regular physical activity in contributing to bone health.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


December 31, 2006, 7:47 PM CT

Adults Living With Children Eat More Fat

Adults Living With Children Eat More Fat
Adults living with children eat more saturated fat -- the equivalent of nearly an entire frozen pepperoni pizza each week -- than do adults who do not live with children, as per a University of Iowa and University of Michigan Health System study.

The finding was based on data from the federal government's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. The UI-led study was made public today, and the paper will appear in the Jan. 4, 2007, online edition of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

Most family diet studies have examined how adults influence children's eating habits, but few studies have considered how children or their habits may be linked to adults' food intake, said Helena Laroche, M.D., an associate in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the study's primary author.

"The analysis shows that adults' fat intake, especially saturated fat, is higher for those who live with children in comparison to adults who don't live with children," Laroche said.

"The study doesn't prove that the presence of children causes adults to eat more fat; people living with children may have different eating habits for a number of reasons. However, an important implication of the study is that healthy changes in eating need to focus on the entire household, not just individuals. Health care professionals must also help families find ways to fit healthy foods into their busy lifestyles," she added.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


December 23, 2006, 9:25 AM CT

Is Trans Fat Ban Enough?

Is Trans Fat Ban Enough?
You might have read in the news that recently New York City passed a law to phase out the use of trans fat in restaurants. It is rumored that other cities, including Boston and Chicago, might follow the lead. The question is it enough? Experts say that it is one step in the right direction, but insist that lot more to be done. I tend to agree with them.

Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, Gershoff is a professor of nutrition science and policy at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science. She says that ban is a step in the right direction, but restaurateurs need to replace partially hydrogenated fat with unsaturated fat. If they choose saturated fat it would diminish the health benefits of this new initiative. Another new regulation that requires some restaurants to provide calorie information as prominently as price might be even more important, notes Lichtenstein.

"There is no biological need for trans fat and intake is linked to adverse health outcomes. However, the media attention on the trans fat announcement to the exclusion of the calorie labeling is unfortunate. Two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has proposed that the calorie content of food items be displayed as prominently as the price, at the point of purchase," says Lichtenstein, also director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


December 20, 2006, 6:56 PM CT

Microbes Living In The Gut May Contribute To Obesity

Microbes Living In The Gut May Contribute To Obesity
A link between obesity and the microbial communities living in our guts is suggested by new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings indicate that our gut microbes are biomarkers, mediators and potential therapeutic targets in the war against the worldwide obesity epide.

A link between obesity and the microbial communities living in our guts is suggested by new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings indicate that our gut microbes are biomarkers, mediators and potential therapeutic targets in the war against the worldwide obesity epidemic.

In two studies published this week in the journal Nature, the researchers report that the relative abundance of two of the most common groups of gut bacteria is altered in both obese humans and mice. By sequencing the genes present in gut microbial communities of obese and lean mice, and by observing the effects of transplanting these communities into germ-free mice, the scientists showed that the obese microbial community has an increased capacity to harvest calories from the diet.

"The amount of calories you consume by eating, and the amount of calories you expend by exercising are key determinants of your tendency to be obese or lean," says lead investigator Jeffrey Gordon, M.D., director of the Center for Genome Sciences and the Dr. Robert J. Glaser Distinguished University Professor. "Our studies imply that differences in our gut microbial ecology may determine how a number of calories we are able to extract and absorb from our diet and deposit in our fat cells."........

Posted by: Evelyn      Permalink         Source


December 13, 2006, 5:09 AM CT

Obesity Linked to Acid Reflux Disease

Obesity Linked to Acid Reflux Disease
As per a new article in The American Journal of Gastroenterology, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GRD), more usually known as, acid reflux, is associated with obesity. Since (GRD) is strongly linked to more serious conditions, such as esophageal ulcers and cancer, weight reduction treatment may be useful in therapy and prevention of these conditions.

"The condition is very common, but prior studies have not been successful at pinpointing risk factors for the condition," says Douglas Corley, author of the study. "Because we evaluated the results of 20 studies on the subject, we were able to better identify and understand the association between obesity and acid reflux".

In a nation becoming increasingly aware of the dangers of obesity, this new finding provides yet another reason to discuss weight management with a physician. "We know that an increase in body weight increases the chance of having heartburn and acid reflux, which can increase the risk of esophageal ulcers and cancer," says Corley. "While we can't say at this time that weight loss treatment is definitely the solution to this condition, it certainly warrants further research as a therapy".........

Posted by: Evelyn      Permalink         Source


December 12, 2006, 5:13 AM CT

Obesity Epidemic Will Cause Thousands More Cases Of Cancer

Obesity Epidemic Will Cause Thousands More Cases Of Cancer
Cancer Research UK today put Britain on a warning that the rising tide of obesity could result in as a number of as 12,000 cases of weight related cancer diagnosed annually by 2010.

The most recent figures show that in 2003 there were 24.2 million obese or overweight people in the UK. The department of health has predicted a 14 per cent increase by 2010 which means the numbers will rise to 27.6 million.

Cancer Research UK statisticians have calculated that if the rate of obese and overweight people continues to rise - as the government has predicted - there will be an increase of around 1500 weight related cancers per year by 2010.

Scientists have estimated that excess weight causes 3.8 per cent of cancers. The projected rise in people becoming overweight or obese means that weight related cancers are likely to rise from 10, 500 cases per year to 12,000 in just seven years.

After smoking obesity is one of the most important preventable causes of cancer. But few people are aware that being overweight or obese increases the risk of developing the disease. A Cancer Research UK survey has shown that only 29 per cent of overweight or obese people are aware of the cancer connection.

Professor Tim Key, Cancer Research UK epidemiologist and expert on diet and cancer, said: "It is now well established that being overweight increases the risk of developing several types of cancer. The effects on breast and womb cancer are almost certainly due to the increased production of the hormone oestrogen in the fatty tissue. We are less sure of the precise mechanisms in other obesity related cancers but we can confidently predict that the number of these cases will increase unless the rise in obesity in Britain can be reversed".........

Posted by: Evelyn      Permalink         Source


December 3, 2006, 8:40 PM CT

Underweight women at greater risk of miscarriage

Underweight women at greater risk of miscarriage
Women who have a low body mass index before they become pregnant are 72% more likely to suffer a miscarriage in the first three months of pregnancy, but can reduce their risk significantly by taking supplements and eating fresh fruit and vegetables, as per study findings published online today.

These are some of the findings of a new study, which appears today in the online edition of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The study, from a team based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, aimed to examine the association between biological, behavioural and lifestyle risk factors and the risk of miscarriage, which affects an estimated quarter of a million women in the UK every year1.

While there are many well-established risk factors, such as increased maternal age, a prior history of miscarriage, and infertility, the causes of the majority of miscarriages are not fully understood. A number of supposed risk factors, for example alcohol consumption, smoking and caffeine intake, remain controversial or unconfirmed.

The scientists questioned 603 women aged 18-55 in the UK whose most recent pregnancy had ended in first trimester miscarriage (less than 13 weeks gestation) and 6,116 women whose most recent pregnancy had progressed beyond 12 weeks. The women were asked about socio-demographic, behavioural and other factors in their most recent pregnancy. The findings confirmed the findings of prior studies into possible risk factors, for example in relation to increased maternal age and alcohol consumption, but they also revealed many interesting new associations.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Permalink         Source


December 1, 2006, 4:45 AM CT

Weight Training Intensity And Growth Hormone Levels

Weight Training Intensity And Growth Hormone Levels
A study published in the recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism looked at different forms of growth hormone, used different testing methods, and varied weight training regimens. The research found that the role of growth hormone in women's muscle development may be more complicated than previously thought.

"We found that growth hormone was responsive to moderate and heavy exercise regimens having 3-12 repetitions with varying weight loading," said the study's principal author, William J. Kraemer. "Women need to have heavy loading cycle or workout in their resistance training routines, as it helps to build muscle and bone".

The study, "Chronic resistance training in women potentiates growth hormone in vivo bioactivity: characterization of molecular mass variants," was carried out by Kraemer, Jeff S. Volek, Barry A. Spiering and Carl M. Maresh of the University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bradley C. Nindl, U.S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass.; James O. Marx, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Lincoln A. Gotshalk, University of Hawaii at Hilo; Jill A. Bush, University of Houston, Texas; and Jill R. Welsch, Andrea M. Mastro and Wesley C. Hymer, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Penn. The The American Physiological Society published the study.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Permalink         Source


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