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April 1, 2011, 7:14 AM CT

Maple syrup: next champion food?

Maple syrup: next champion food?
There's more good news about pure maple syrup from the University of Rhode Island (URI). Scientists there have now identified 54 compounds in maple syrup from Canada, double the amount previously reported, and a number of with antioxidant activity and potential health benefits. In laboratory studies, they acted as anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agents. Initial studies also suggest that maple compounds may inhibit enzymes relevant in Type 2 diabetes management.

These new findings were presented on March 30th at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim, CA, during a day-long session exclusively examining the bioactive compounds found in natural sweeteners. The session was organized and chaired by Dr. Navindra Seeram, assistant pharmacy professor at URI and a lead scientist on the maple syrup research team.

As per the URI research team, maple syrup contains a cocktail of polyphenol compounds, several with antioxidant properties and a number of with well-documented health benefits. "We found a wide variety of polyphenols in maple syrup," said Seeram. "It is a one-stop shop for these beneficial compounds, several of which are also found in berries, tea, red wine and flaxseed, just to name a few," Seeram continued. "Not all sweeteners are created equal. When choosing a sweetener, pure maple syrup appears to be a better choice because of the range of antioxidant compounds not found in other sweeteners".........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


March 30, 2011, 7:08 AM CT

Frequency of fat talk

Frequency of fat talk
College women who engage in "fat talk" (women speaking negatively about the size and shape of their bodies) face greater dissatisfaction with their bodies and are more likely to have internalized an ultra-thin body ideal than those who engage in fat talk less frequently, as per a review article from Psychology of Women Quarterly (published by SAGE).

Study results observed that while frequency of fat talk was linked to increased dissatisfaction with women's own bodies, over half of the participants reported that they believe fat talk actually makes them feel better about their bodies. It's concerning that women might think fat talk is a helpful coping mechanism, when it's actually exacerbating body image disturbance. Scientists Rachel H. Salk of the University of Wisconsin and Renee Engeln-Maddox of Northwestern University observed that "fat talk" is overwhelmingly common in the college-age women they studied, with more than 90 percent reporting they engaged in "fat talk." .

"The most common response to fat talk was denial that the friend was fat," wrote Salk and Engeln-Maddox, "most typically leading to a back-and-forth conversation where each of two healthy weight peers denies the other is fat while claiming to be fat themselves".

An additional interesting finding was that the frequency of "fat talk" was not correlation to a respondent's BMI. "In other words, there was no association between a woman's actual body size and how often she complained about her body size with peers," Salk and Engeln-Maddox wrote.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


March 17, 2011, 11:00 PM CT

Gardening linked to increased vegetable consumption

Gardening linked to increased vegetable consumption
New research from Texas A&M University and Texas State University observed that elderly adults who participate in gardening appears to be more likely to eat their veggies. The report, published in HortTechnology, presents the results of an online survey of adults aged 50+ and includes recommendations for promoting gardening "intervention" programs to elderly adults.

As per scientists Aime Sommerfeld, Amy McFarland, Tina Waliczek, and Jayne Zajicek, studies have shown that poor nutrition is one of several factors responsible for mortality and morbidity in the elderly and is comparable to deaths caused from cigarette smoking. "Eventhough elderly adults tend to report a higher intake of fruit and vegetables than other age groups, over half of the U.S. older population does not meet the recommendation of five daily servings of fruit and vegetables." They added that several prior research studies confirmed that gardening is one way to increase individuals' fruit and vegetable intake.

The objectives of the study were to examine and compare fruit and vegetable consumption of gardeners and nongardeners, and to investigate differences in fruit and vegetable consumption of long-term gardeners compared with newer gardeners. To collect the information, an online survey was posted on a web site for one month; 261 questionnaires were completed by adults aged 50 years and older.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


February 27, 2011, 7:33 PM CT

Keep Yourself in Shape with an Extreme Sport

Keep Yourself in Shape with an Extreme Sport
Modern society is very health conscious which could be the reason why many people are finding new and exciting ways to keep fit and in shape. Instead of heading to the gym on a daily basis, many people are taking up an extreme sport. This not only provides exercise, but it is a great adrenaline rush that cannot be had when running on a treadmill in a sweaty gym.

Rock climbing has been one of the popular extreme sport choices for people looking to maintain their weight and stay fit. The nice thing about this sport is that it can be done in the gym and outdoors. People who have taken up rock climbing travel around the world to tackle some of the greatest climbs. In South Thailand, rock climbing is very popular and many people will book cheap flights to Phuket to venture out on a rock climbing expedition. Rock climbing can provide many benefits for the body. Aside from building lean muscle, the sport is a great cardiovascular workout.

Mountain biking is another extreme sport that is taken up to keep in shape. Instead of riding a stationary bike, people are hitting the trails on their bike, enjoying the natural surroundings while getting a great workout. Mountain biking can be done in various levels. There are trails designed for the beginner rider and others for those who have a lot of experience. Choosing the difficulty of a trail or course will depend on your strength, endurance and stamina.

For those who live in the tropics, surfing is a sport that will provide an ultimate rush while keeping the body in shape. This sport looks fun and appears as though no effort is needed. However, when you get out there, you will realize it is anything but easy. Surfing is exhausting and burns a lot of body fat.

Scuba diving is usually thought of as a leisure activity that is done at a beach resort. While this can be true, this is actually considered to be an extreme sport and it can help you lose weight and stay in shape. Scuba diving will allow the body to burn as many as 490 calories per hour.

Skiing and snowboarding are both fun winter sports that can help you shed a few pounds. Most people have trouble sticking to an exercise regime during the winter months. By taking up skiing or snowboarding, you will get the exercise you need and will tone muscles that you didn’t know exist! Skiing can burn 500 calories an hour while cross-country skiing can burn 560. Light snowboarders can expect to burn 367 calories in an hour while the more experienced boarders can get rid of 588 an hour.

No matter what your preference is, an extreme sport can be adventurous, fun and beneficial to your health. Exercise does not have to be boring and mundane. Many people are getting out of the gym and into extreme sports to keep in shape and burn off some extra calories.

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


Thu, 03 Feb 2011 13:12:12 GMT

Have a fat day!

Have a fat day!
I"ve said many times before I"d do Channing Tatum ROTTEN. He"s is looking dirty hot (literally, filthy) in his new movie The Eagle. No shower necessary!

When he"s not filming, Chan is known to chase the chunk. There"s even a video showcase highlighting his body transformations!


Dramatic weight gain and loss is not ideal, so learn to scale it back. Rather than effectively let yourself go, appreciate the value of a good old fashioned fat day! Sometimes everybody NEEDS to just let go (read about a recent calorie fest on my blog).

Some suggest that allowing regular cheat days actually helps stay on track with a diet plan because we"re not denying ourselves those terrible, yet delicious things we want the most. Every now and then it"s ok to go ahead and indulge. I give you the green light to (occasional) gluttony!

Can"t get enough Channing Tatum?
See him hot, shirtless and playing with cock at BETTERby30!

*W*

† More lusty fitness features at BETTERby30!
† Follow Wes on Twitter @Westopher

Posted by: Popbytes      Read more     Source


January 16, 2011, 8:44 PM CT

Big breakfast bunkum

Big breakfast bunkum
Does eating a big breakfast help weight loss or is it better to skip breakfast altogether? Available information is confusing but new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition Journal clears a path through these apparently contradictory reports.

Dr Volker Schusdziarra, from the Else-Kr�ner-Fresenius Center of Nutritional Medicine, conducted a study on over 300 people who were asked to keep a journal of what they commonly ate. Within the group sometimes people ate a big breakfast, sometimes small, and sometimes skipped it all together.

Schusdziarra said that "the results of the study showed that people ate the same at lunch and dinner, regardless of what they had for breakfast", this means that a big breakfast (on average 400kcal greater than a small breakfast) resulted in a total increase in calories eaten over the day of about 400kcal. The only difference seen was the skipping of a mid morning snack when someone ate a really big breakfast, however this was not enough to offset the extra calories they had already eaten.

The group addressed prior research, which suggests that eating a big breakfast reduces total calorie intake over the day, and showed that this data is misleading. This earlier research only looked at the ratio of breakfast calories to daily calories and in Schusdziarra's study this ratio seems to be most affected by people eating less during the day. In other words their breakfast was proportionally, but not absolutely, bigger. So it seems that there is no magic and that, unfortunately, in the fight for weight-loss, eating a large breakfast must be counteracted by eating substantially less during the rest of the day. In order to lose weight sensibly NHS guidelines suggest restricting calorie intake, cutting down on saturated fat and sugar, and eating 5-a-day fruit and veg.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


January 5, 2011, 6:56 AM CT

Obesity research targets the brain's use of fatty acids

Obesity research targets the brain's use of fatty acids
Scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have created a new and exciting mouse model to study how lipid sensing and metabolism in the brain relate to the regulation of energy balance and body weight. The research team, led by Hong Wang, PhD, created mice with a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in neurons, and observed two important reactions. First, the mouse models ate less and second, they became sedentary. Because LPL is important to the delivery of fatty acids to the brain, these responses spotlight the importance of fatty acid delivery to the brain in the regulation of body weight.

"This work may have important impact in understanding the causes of obesity and providing new therapys for this epidemic of our time," said Robert H. Eckel, MD, corresponding and senior author of "Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Modifies the Regulation of Energy Balance and Leads to Obesity" which was published recently in Cell Metabolism.

The genetically-modified mouse (NEXLPL) has a defect in the breakdown of dietary lipoprotein triglycerides into fatty acids in the brain. These mice became obese on a standard chow diet between three and six months. At that point, the mice ate less and were less active.

The research also looked at which areas of the brain have the greatest impact on regulating body weight and learned that the hypothalamus appears to be the key area to observe as NEXLPL mice have increases in hypothalamic AgRP/NPY gene expression before obesity. AgRP/NPY cause increases in food intake and decreases in energy expenditure. Scientists also noted that the NEXLPL mice demonstrate deficiencies in n-3 fatty acids in the hypothalamus. Overall, this research indicates that the lipoproteins are sensed in the brain by an LPL-dependent pathway and provide lipid signals for the central regulation of body weight and energy balance.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


January 2, 2011, 10:26 PM CT

Defining Your Abs

Defining Your Abs
s much as some of us would like to forget about it, exercise - like diet - is an equally important part of healthy weight loss. If we think about it long enough, we can come up with a number of excuses for not getting in a routine workout: I'm tired, the weather is bad, joining a gym costs too much, I'm too busy, etc. But the Flex Belt makes it so easy to get in an abdominal workout that some of us may run out of excuses. Traditional ab workouts can be time-consuming, exhausting, and ineffective if you do not intentionally work all muscle areas in your abs on a regular basis. However, the Flex Belt solves all of these problems.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Flex Belt gives you a low-impact abdominal workout simply by wearing it. Through medical gel pads that are strategically positioned, the belt sends pulses that tell the nerves in your abdominal muscles to expand and contract. You are able to control the intensity of your workout by adjusting the level between 1 and 100. This safe, effective device has been proven to give positive results (like smaller waist lines, stronger abs, and better sit-up tolerance) in a clinical trial. In fact, every respondent claimed that they noticed an improvement in the flatness and tone of their abdominal muscles.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


December 21, 2010, 6:49 AM CT

Squeezing out maximum health benefits

Squeezing out maximum health benefits
BYU nutritionist Tory Parker published a study identifying which compounds -- in the right proportions -- in an orange contribute the most to good health. The results could be used to develop a super-supplement that mimics an orange's effects on the body.

Credit: Mark Philbrick.

In time for Christmas, BYU nutritionists are squeezing all the healthy compounds out of oranges to find just the right mixture responsible for their age-old health benefits.

The popular stocking stuffer is known for its vitamin C and blood-protecting antioxidants, but scientists wanted to learn why a whole orange is better for you than its components when taken separately. The ultimate outcome of the research could be a super-supplement that captures the best health benefits of eating oranges and drinking orange juice.

"There's something about an orange that's better than taking a vitamin C capsule, and that's really what we're trying to figure out," said Tory Parker, BYU assistant professor of nutrition, dietetics and food science. "We think it's the particular mixture of antioxidants in an orange that makes it so good for you".

The team published the best health-promoting combinations of those natural antioxidants in a recent issue of the Journal of Food Science The paper's main author, Brenner Freeman, was a BYU undergrad when he conducted the research.

Now applying to medical schools, Brenner chose to study oranges because he was raised on a citrus orchard in Arizona.

"I spent a lot of time hunched over a lab bench in the dark doing this research," Freeman said. "But what I learned was worth it, and having this publication definitely gives me an advantage on my med school applications".........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


December 15, 2010, 7:08 AM CT

Mothers' diets and children's eating habit

Mothers' diets and children's eating habit
Mildred Horodynski, College of Nursing professor, is looking at the impact mothers' diets have on their children's eating habits.

Credit: MSU College of Nursing

As health professionals search for ways to combat the rise in obesity and promote healthy eating, new research reveals a mother's own eating habits and whether she views her child as a 'picky eater' has a huge impact on whether her child consumes enough fruits and vegetables.

A study by professor Mildred Horodynski of Michigan State University's College of Nursing looked at nearly 400 low-income women (black and non-Hispanic white) with children ages 1-3 enrolled in Early Head Start programs. Results show toddlers were less likely to consume fruits and vegetables four or more times a week if their mothers did not consume that amount or if their mothers viewed their children as picky eaters.

"What and how mothers eat is the most direct influence on what toddlers eat," Horodynski said. "Health professionals need to consider this when developing strategies to increase a child's consumption of healthy foods. Diets low in fruit and vegetables even at young ages pose increased risks for chronic diseases during the later part of life".

The research was published recently in the journal Public Health Nursing

When mothers viewed their children as picky eaters unwilling to try nonfamiliar foods a decrease also was seen in the amount of fruits and vegetables consumed.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


November 8, 2010, 7:43 AM CT

Caveman behavioral traits might kick in at Thanksgiving

Caveman behavioral traits might kick in at Thanksgiving
Frank Kachanoff was surprised. He thought the sight of meat on the table would make people more aggressive, not less. After all, dont football coaches feed their players big hunks of red meat before a game in hopes of pumping them up? And what about our images of a grunting or growling animal snarling at anyone who dares take their meat away from them? Wouldnt that go for humans, too?

Kachanoff, a researcher with a special interest in evolution at McGill Universitys Department of Psychology, has discovered quite the reverse. As per research presented at a recent symposium at McGill, seeing meat appears to make human beings significantly less aggressive. I was inspired by research on priming and aggression, that has shown that just looking at an object which is learned to be linked to aggression, such as a gun, can make someone more likely to behave aggressively. I wanted to know if we might respond aggressively to certain stimuli in our environment not because of learned associations, but because of an innate predisposition. I wanted to know if just looking at the meat would suffice to provoke an aggressive behavior.

The idea that meat would illicit aggressive behaviour makes sense, as it would have helped our primate ancestors with hunting, co-opting and protecting their meat resources. Kachanoff believed that humans may therefore have evolved an innate predisposition to respond aggressively towards meat, and recruited 82 males to test his theory, using long-established techniques for provoking and measuring aggression. The experiment itself was quite simple subjects had to punish a script reader every time he made an error while sorting photos, some with pictures of meat, and others with neutral imagery. The subjects believed that they could inflict various volumes of sound, including painful, to the script reader, which he would hear after his performance. While the research team figured that the group sorting pictures of meat would inflict more discomfort on the reader, they were very surprised by the results.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


October 12, 2010, 7:11 AM CT

Lose the Weight, NOT the Potatoes

Lose the Weight, NOT the Potatoes
Research just released by the University of California, Davis and the National Center for Food Safety and Technology, Illinois Institute of Technology demonstrates that people can include potatoes in their diet and still lose weight. This research was presented at the Obesity Society's 28th Annual Scientific Meeting October 8-12, 2010.

The study sought to gain a better understanding of the role of potatoes and the glycemic index in weight loss, largely because some have questioned the inclusion of potatoes in a weight loss regimen due to the vegetable's designation as a high glycemic index (HGI) food.

"The results of this study confirm what health professionals and nutrition experts have said for years; when it comes to weight loss, it is not about eliminating a certain food or food groups, rather, it is reducing calories that count," said lead researcher Dr. Britt Burton-Freeman, PhD, MS. "There is no evidence that potatoes, when prepared in a healthful manner, contribute to weight gain. In fact, we are seeing that they can be part of a weight loss program."

Scientists studied 86 overweight men and women over the course of 12 weeks to measure the effects of a reduced-calorie modified glycemic index diet with the addition of potatoes. The subjects were randomly assigned to three groups and each had a diet that included five to seven servings of potatoes per week. The results indicated that all three groups lost weight.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


October 11, 2010, 7:38 AM CT

Genetics of obesity and fat distribution

Genetics of obesity and fat distribution
An international consortium has made significant inroads into uncovering the genetic basis of obesity by identifying 18 new gene sites linked to overall obesity and 13 that affect fat distribution. The studies include data from nearly a quarter of a million participants, the largest genetic investigation of human traits to date. The papers, both from the GIANT (Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits) consortium which consists of more than 400 researchers from 280 research institutions worldwide will appear in Nature Genetics and are receiving early online publication.

Joel Hirschhorn, MD, PhD of Children's Hospital Boston and the Broad Institute, a senior author on the overall obesity paper and involved in both, says, "Different people have different susceptibilities to obesity. Some don't rigorously watch what they eat or how much they exercise and still resist gaining weight, while others constantly struggle to keep their weight from skyrocketing. Some of this variability is genetic, and our goal was to increase understanding of why different people have different inherited susceptibility to obesity." Because most of the genes newly implicated in these studies have never been suspected of having a role in obesity, findings from both papers begin to shed light on the underlying biology, which may lead to better categorization and therapy of obesity in the future, Hirschhorn notes.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


October 8, 2010, 6:10 AM CT

Obese workers cost workplace more than insurance, absenteeism

Obese workers cost workplace more than insurance, absenteeism
The cost of obesity among U.S. full-time employees is estimated to be $73.1 billion, as per a newly released study by a Duke University obesity researcher, published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

This is the first study to quantify the total value of lost job productivity as a result of health problems, which it finds is more costly than medical expenditures.

Led by Eric Finkelstein, deputy director for health services and systems research at Duke-National University of Singapore, the study quantified the per capita cost of obesity among full-time workers by considering three factors: employee medical expenditures, lost productivity on the job due to health problems (presenteeism), and absence from work (absenteeism).

Collectively, the per capita costs of obesity are as high as $16,900 for obese women with a body mass index (BMI) over 40 (roughly 100 pounds overweight) and $15,500 for obese men in the same BMI class. Presenteeism makes up the largest share of those costs. Finkelstein observed that presenteeism accounted for as much as 56 percent of the total cost of obesity for women, and 68 percent for men. Even among those in the normal weight range, the value of lost productivity due to health problems far exceeded the medical costs.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


September 22, 2010, 7:19 AM CT

Physician's personal habits matter in counseling

Physician's personal habits matter in counseling
Physician's confidence in their ability to counsel patients on a healthy diet and exercise appears to be correlation to their own personal habits, as per a research studyby the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center.

Factors that predicted confidence in counseling included the doctor's own exercise time, being overweight, and if the doctor had adequate training in counseling patients.

The study, published online ahead of print Oct. 1 in Preventive Cardiology, shows doctors' own health habits matter when it comes to patient counseling.

"Living a healthy lifestyle themselves translates into a more believable message to their patients," says main author Michael Howe, M.D., chief medical resident at U-M Health System. "Physicians are busy, particularly during their training; but eating healthy foods and exercising regularly may result in better personal health as well as improved patient care".

A majority of attending physicians, those who have completed their doctor training, talked to patients about a healthy diet in comparison to only 36 percent of trainees, young doctors still in internship or residency programs.

But in the survey, attending physicians reported taking better care of themselves than trainees whose diets were heavier in fast food.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


September 8, 2010, 7:12 AM CT

Teasing about weight can affect pre-teens

Teasing about weight can affect pre-teens
Schoolyard taunts of any type can potentially damage a child's sense of self-confidence. But a newly released study suggests that a particular kind of teasing about weight can have distinctive and significant effects on how pre-teens perceive their own bodies.

The research, among the first to specifically examine the impact of weight-based criticism on pre-adolescents, also hints that the practice can cause other health and emotional issues for its victims.

"We tend to think of adolescence as the time when kids become sensitive about their body image, but our findings suggest that the seeds of body dissatisfaction are actually being sown much earlier," said Timothy D. Nelson, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the study's main author. "Criticism of weight, in particular, can contribute to issues that go beyond general problems with self-esteem".

For the study, Nelson and colleagues surveyed hundreds of public school students whose average age was 10.8 years. They collected participants' heights and weights and calculated their Body Mass Index, then examined the relationships between weight-related criticism and children's perceptions of themselves.

Their results showed that overweight pre-teens who endured weight-based criticism tended to judge their bodies more harshly and were less satisfied with their body sizes than students who weren't teased about their weight.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


September 1, 2010, 7:14 AM CT

Obesity, diabetes epidemics continue to grow

Obesity, diabetes epidemics continue to grow
A majority of adults in California are obese or overweight, and more than 2 million have been diagnosed with diabetes, as per a newly released study from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Both conditions - which are correlation to each other as well as to heart disease - increased significantly in just six years, with the prevalence of diabetes alone jumping nearly 26 percent between 2001 and 2007.

The "epidemic" of obesity and diabetes leaves no racial, ethnic, economic or geographic segment of the state unscathed, as per the researchers. Eventhough American Indians, African Americans and Latinos are especially affected by both obesity and diabetes, these conditions increased among all racial and ethnic groups between 2001 and 2007.

Similarly, while both conditions disproportionately affect the poorest Californians, there were upward trends in prevalence among all income groups during the same time period. California's youth are also affected: More than a quarter of California adolescents - some 970,000 children - are obese or overweight.

"When so a number of people of different ages, income and educational levels, and cultural backgrounds are struggling with obesity and diabetes, it suggests that 'going on a diet' is not enough," said research co-author Dr. Allison Diamant, a faculty associate with the center and an associate adjunct professor of general internal medicine and health services research. "We need to take a hard look at the environmental and structural factors that contribute to these conditions".........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


August 31, 2010, 7:05 AM CT

Combining resistance and endurance training

Combining resistance and endurance training
A study of triathletes reported in the online edition and recent issue of Radiology reveals that the heart adapts to triathlon training by working more efficiently.

"To our knowledge, this is the first study using MRI to investigate effects of triathlon training on cardiac adaptations," said lead researcher Michael M. Lell, M.D., associate professor at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Erlangen, Gera number of.

Dr. Lell and his colleagues conducted cardiac MRI on 26 professional male triathletes (mean age 27.9) and 27 male controls (mean age 27.3), who were recreationally active no more than three hours per week. Triathletes in the study were top national and international competitors with six or more years of continuous training. Triathlons are multi-sport events consisting of swimming, cycling and running various distances in succession.

The cardiac MR images revealed that, in comparison to the recreational athletes, the triathletes had larger left atria and larger right and left ventricles. The triathletes' left and right ventricles also had greater muscle mass and wall thickness.

"In competitive athletes, it is important to distinguish physiological adaptations as a result of training from pathological conditions such as cardiomyopathy, the most common cause of sudden cardiac death," Dr. Lell said.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


August 25, 2010, 7:02 AM CT

Fat distribution plays a role in weight loss

Fat distribution plays a role in weight loss
Why is it that some people lose weight and body fat when they exercise and eat less and others don't? German scientists say MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy can provide the answer and help predict who will benefit from changes in lifestyle. Results of the study are published online and will appear in the recent issue of the journal Radiology

"You may have two individuals who weigh the same and have the same body mass index (BMI), but have very different levels of internal fat," said lead researcher and physicist Jrgen Machann, Dipl. Phys., from University Hospital Tbingen in Tbingen, Gera number of. "Abdominal and liver fat are the two most important factors in predicting whether a lifestyle intervention will be successful."

Machann and scientists performed MRI and MR spectroscopy on 243 individuals previous to and nine months after a lifestyle intervention. The intervention called for a weight loss of 5 percent, reducing fat intake to a maximum of 30 percent of total calories (including less than 10 percent in the form of saturated fat) and engaging in moderate physical activity such as walking at least three hours a week.

Each of the participants, which included 144 females (mean age 44.5 years) and 99 males (mean age 47.3), was considered at risk of developing type 2 diabetes as a result of obesity, measured by a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or greater or having an impaired glucose tolerance or a first-degree relative with the disease.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


August 19, 2010, 6:53 AM CT

Delaying fat digestion to curb appetite

Delaying fat digestion to curb appetite
Institute of Food Research researchers have discovered an unexpected synergy that helps break down fat. The discovery provides a focus to find ways to slow down fat digestion, and ultimately to create food structures that induce satiety.

"Much of the fat in processed foods is eaten in the form of emulsions such as soups, yoghurt, ice cream and mayonnaise,"" said Dr Peter Wilde from the Institute of Food Research, an institute of BBSRC. "We are unpicking the mechanisms of digestion used to break them down so we can design fats in a rational way that are digested more slowly".

If the digestion of fat is delayed and fatty acids are able to reach the ileum, the final section of the small intestine, their presence stimulates satiety-inducing hormones.

IFR researchers have been experimenting with using protein layers to stabilise emulsions and delay fat digestion.

In this study, they observed that a normally-stable whey protein is partially broken down when it is attached to the surface of an emulsion. When a surfactant is introduced, this acts synergistically with the fat, breaking down the protein layer even more effectively. With the barrier weakened, access is improved for the enzymes and bile salts that break down fat.

"We are now experimenting with heat and enzyme therapys to reduce the synergistic effect and make the protein barrier stronger," said Dr Wilde.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


August 11, 2010, 7:41 PM CT

Sugary drinks do not cause weight gain

Sugary drinks do not cause weight gain
New research from Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, shows that sugary drinks, consumed in moderate quantities, do not promote weight gain, carbohydrate craving or adverse mood effects in overweight women when they do not know what they are drinking.

The study, 'Effects of sucrose drinks on macronutrient intake, body weight, and mood state in overweight women over 4 weeks', which was conducted by Marie Reid, Richard Hammersley and his colleagues set out to determine the long-term effects of adding a sucrose drink to the diet of overweight women (BMI 25-30, aged 20 - 55), on dietary intake and mood. The results show that overweight women do not suffer adverse effects, such as weight gain or mood fluctuation, if they do not know whether or not they are drinking a sugary or artificially sweetened drink. Instead women took in fewer calories elsewhere in the diet, to balance the calories in the drinks.

In a single-blind, between-subjects design, soft drinks (4 x 25cl per day; 1800 kJ sucrose sweetened versus 67 kJ aspartame sweetened) were added to the diet of overweight women (n = 53, BMI 25 30, age 20 55) for 4 weeks. Participants were split into two groups and at the beginning of each week subjects took away 28 bottles of an unidentified drink for that week (4 per day). One group received sucrose (n = 24), the other aspartame (n = 29).........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


August 11, 2010, 7:39 PM CT

Improve weight loss success

Improve weight loss success
Most weight loss programs try to motivate individuals with warnings of the long-term health consequences of obesity: increased risk for cancer, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and asthma. New research suggests the immediate health benefitssuch as reduced painappears to be the most effective motivator for helping obese individuals shed extra weight and commit to keeping it off.

In a pilot research study, University of Cincinnati (UC) scientists observed that 21 percent of participants in a local dietary weight loss program reported significantly less pain in the lower extremities and back after losing an average of 10 pounds. Additionally, study participants reported a 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall bodily pain after weight loss.

Scientists say their results indicate that even small weight loss can relieve pain and reduce the burden excessive weight puts on the musculoskeletal system.

"By focusing on an immediate benefit that can be feltlike pain reductioninstead of the future health impact of obesity, weight loss programs appears to be able to inspire overweight individuals to lose weight," says Susan Kotowski, PhD, study collaborator and director of the Gait and Movement Analysis Laboratory in the UC College of Allied Health Sciences.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source


July 13, 2010, 7:00 AM CT

Obesity is associated with reduced sensitivity to fat

Obesity is associated with reduced sensitivity to fat
Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, finds marked differences between obese and lean men in how they respond to the taste of fat. Fat also is less effective in obese men in stimulating certain gut hormones that are released into the bloodstream and normally suppress appetite.

The rate of obesity continues to rise within the United States and around the world, and over-consumption of calorie-laden fatty foods are an obvious culprit. How much we eat can be influenced by how foods taste and their effects on physiological responses in the gut. A reduced ability to taste and react to fat could lead to overeating and obesity. A team led by Prof. Christine Feinle-Bisset, from the University of Adelaide, Australia, asked lean and obese men to sip drinks with small amounts of fat and indicate when they could taste the fat. The scientists also measured blood levels of a hormone that is normally released from the gut when fat is consumed. Dr. Feinle-Bisset said: "We observed that being obese was linked to a reduced ability to detect fat taste, and with reduced release of an appetite-suppressing gut hormone". The results could help scientists understand more about why some obese individuals are more prone to eating a high-fat diet than lean individuals.........

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July 13, 2010, 6:52 AM CT

Food marketing to children

Food marketing to children
The last six years have seen significant progress in efforts to curb the marketing of unhealthy food to children, with an increasing number of governments taking on the issue, but considerable challenges remain, a leading expert on the topic said today (Tuesday).

At the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm, Tim Lobstein presented an analysis of the European policy landscape, undertaken as part of the European Commission's effort to gather evidence to support policy making on the marketing of foods to children.

For a number of years, public health experts have argued that the marketing of calorie-packed food and drinks to children contributes to the global obesity problem, but the issue has gained more traction over the last few years as concern over the scale of childhood obesity and has grown and as efforts to combat it have progressed.

"An increasing number of countries are trying to address this issue, with some introducing regulations addressing television advertising during children's programming or the use of familiar personalities or fictional characters to promote products during that television time slot. There is real progress, but the challenges are numerous," said Lobstein, director of policy at the International Association for the Study of Obesity, which coordinated the European Union PolMark study. "Firstly, most countries do not address advertising to children by the calorie content or other nutrient quality of the food product and marketing channels beyond broadcast advertising have been largely ignored. Secondly, our research has shown that there's a certain amount of anarchy at the moment and concluded that the terms need to be set by government, not the industry itself, because eventhough they appear to be willing, there's chaos within the details, with a lot of contradiction in what industry is offering".........

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July 9, 2010, 6:45 AM CT

Extreme obesity in children linked to reflux disease

Extreme obesity in children linked to reflux disease
Extremely obese children have a 40 percent higher risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and children who are moderately obese have a 30 percent higher risk of GERD in comparison to normal weight children, as per a Kaiser Permanente study published online in the International Journal of Pediatric Obesity

This large population-based study establishes an association between obesity and GERD in children, an association that has been previously reported in adults. GERD can lead to decreased quality of life, chronic respiratory conditions, and increased risk for cancer of the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach) if it persists through adulthood.

Scientists used electronic health records to conduct a cross-sectional study of 690,321 children aged 2 19 years who were members of the Kaiser Permanente Southern California integrated health plan in 2007 and 2008.

About 8 to 25 percent of children in the U.S. appears to be affected by frequent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, depending upon their age and body mass index. GERD is a chronic condition in which the liquid content of the stomach flows up in to the esophagus. This can inflame and damage the lining of the esophagus. GERD appears to be responsible for an increased occurrence of coughs, asthma, and inflammation of the larynx. Left untreated, GERD may result in chronic esophageal inflammation and lasting damage to the esophagus. Cancer of the esophagus is the nation's fastest growing cancer and is expected to double in frequency in the next 20 years -- unlike most other cancers, which are decreasing in frequency. Scientists suspect this rise is due in part to the nation's obesity epidemic.........

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June 28, 2010, 7:42 AM CT

Healthier cafeteria food, more intense gym classe

Healthier cafeteria food, more intense gym classe
IHealthier cafeteria choices, longer and more intense periods of physical activity and robust in-school education programs can lower rates of obesity and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes, as per a national study called HEALTHY.

The findings will be presented Sunday, June 27, at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions event in Orlando, Fla., and will appear online and in the June 29 issue of The New England Journal (NEJM).

UC Irvine was among eight academic medical centers nationwide chosen to participate in the three-year effort, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive & Kidney Diseases, a branch of the National Institutes of Health, and the American Diabetes Association.

"This is the first-ever study to show you can reduce obesity and other risks for type 2 diabetes in kids and do it in schools with at-risk, high-ethnic-minority populations," said pediatrics professor Dr. Dan M. Cooper, UCI's principal investigator for HEALTHY. "It emphasizes that schools can have a tremendous positive impact on a child's health".

Because type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects minorities and low-income people, the study was conducted in U.S. schools with high enrollments of minority children 54 percent Latino and 18 percent African American, on average and kids from low-income families. UCI partnered with middle schools in the Long Beach Unified School District: Bancroft, DeMille, Hoover, Hughes, Marshall and Stephens.........

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May 15, 2010, 8:48 PM CT

Muscle mass building in elderly

Muscle mass building in elderly
For years, scientists have known that resistance exercise training such as weightlifting, in which muscles work against gravity or another force can be one of the most effective ways to fight the debilitating muscle loss caused by aging. But a number of older people are unable to get the full benefits of such training because they suffer from conditions such as arthritis that prevent them from lifting enough weight to stimulate muscle growth. And, while younger men and women continue to produce significant amounts of muscle protein for hours after a resistance exercise workout, seniors receive a much smaller post-workout benefit.

Now, though, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists have determined that moderately and temporarily restricting the flow of blood through muscles a practice adopted by bodybuilders who noticed that it made light weights feel heavier can be combined with low-level resistance exercise training to produce muscle-mass increases in older men.

"We believe that this appears to be a novel therapy for older people who need to bring their muscle mass back up," said UTMB physical treatment professor Blake Rasmussen, senior author of a paper on the investigation ("Blood flow restriction exercise stimulates mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis in older men") appearing in the recent issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology "It could also be used for patients who have had surgery and aren't capable of lifting enough weight to keep their muscles in shape, or for people who have arthritis or other conditions that make lifting heavy weights a problem."........

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April 29, 2010, 6:29 AM CT

Obesity and fibromyalgia

Obesity and fibromyalgia
Scientists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found an association between the level of leisure time physical exercise and a future risk of developing fibromyalgia. The research team also identified BMI as an independent risk factor for fibromyalgia. Details of the study appear in the recent issue of Arthritis Care & Research, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain lasting more than 3 months, and tender point sites in the neck, shoulders, back, hips, arms, and legs. Associated features often include unexplained fatigue, sleep disturbances, headache, cognitive difficulty, and mood disturbances. The prevalence of FM increases with age and is considerably higher among women than men. Eventhough the etiology of FM is poorly understood, a number of authors have suggested that a dysfunctional autonomic nervous system involving deficiencies in the hypothalamicpituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system contributes to the development of FM by altering pain perception and endogenous pain inhibition.

As per the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, FM has been associated with stressful or traumatic events, such as car accidents, repetitive injuries, illness, certain diseases, or FM can occur spontaneously. Some researchers speculate that a gene or genes might be involved in fibromyalgia that could make a person react strongly to things that other people would not find painful.........

Posted by: Evelyn      Read more         Source



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